Government and Corporate

Home Government and Corporate

Government and corporate sector contributes about 70% of all e-waste generated by India. Hence it is utmost important to handled it carefully. As per e-waste rule 2016 they are classified as a bulk consumer and their responsibility as per rule 2016 is:
(1) consumers or bulk consumers of electrical and electronic equipment shall ensure that e-waste generated by them is channelized through dismantler or recycler;
(2) bulk consumers of electrical and electronic equipment shall maintain records of e-waste generated by them in Form-2 and make such records available for scrutiny by the concerned State Pollution Control Board;
(3) consumers or bulk consumers of electrical and electronic equipment shall ensure that such end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment are not admixed with e-waste containing radioactive material as covered under the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 (33 of 1962) and rules made there under;
(4) bulk consumers of electrical and electronic equipment shall file annual returns in Form-3, to the concerned State Pollution Control Board on or before the 30th day of June following the financial year to which that return relates. In case of the bulk consumer with multiple offices in a State, one annual return combining information from all the offices shall be filed to the concerned State Pollution Control Board on or before the 30th day of June following the financial year to which that return relates

Deshwal Waste Management

Government Laws

In effect since 1st day of October, 2016 the government has provided an extended number of comprehensive guidelines that further explore the responsibilities of the corporate as well as the government sector and finally restricts their monopoly on all related operations in this domain. The corporate sector is directed to share the onus on claiming responsibility and acting on it, on the subject of E-waste. The guidelines address this sector primarily as the bulk consumer of electrical and electronic equipment and hence a major generator of the electronic waste. They instruct the corporates to maintain records of the waste generated by them and make the same available for scrutiny by the State Pollution Control Board (SPCB). They are further asked to ensure proper channelization of the electronic waste to appropriate collection centres, recyclers or dismantlers or through the designated take back service provider of the producer to authorised dismantler or recycler. Annual returns are also expected to be filed by the companies falling under the said category (Schedule 1) to the State Pollution Control Board before 30th June of following financial year to which the return is filed. In case of multiple offices in a State, one annual return combining information from all the offices shall be filed to the concerned State Pollution Control Board. The guidelines further instruct the sector to ensure that end of life electronic and electrical equipment is not mixed with E-waste containing radioactive materials as covered under Atomic Energy Act 1962. All in all these guidelines just provide us an insight to the deep rooted problem regarding the problem of E-waste in our country. In fact some believe that they barely scratch the surface, thus it is essential for all stakeholders of the society to come together and not only uphold these given guidelines but generate and employ more. It is time for us to accept this responsibility, we at Deshwal have, it’s now time for you.

Government and Corporate

Problems

In 2016, the E-Waste (Management) Rules placed responsibility on electronic goods manufacturing companies and bulk consumers to collect and channel e-waste from consumers to authorised re-processing units.But despite the new Rules, “There has hardly been any increase in orders. Electronic companies don’t seem to have taken the government very seriously,” he says. In fact, 200 companies that manufacture electronic goods — from smart phones to laptops — got served notices in October by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) for not complying with e-waste procurement norms.The vast majority of electronic waste processing happens in the unorganised sector, which fills a glaring lacuna in the processing cycle, and collects waste from households and establishments.The target group comprises officials of municipal bodies, hospitals, resident welfare associations, market committees, local industries, facility operators, bus depots, malls and railway stations.